Monday, 8 August 2011

THE DEMISE OF JACK TAR (Author unknown)



The traditional male sailor was not defined by his looks. He was defined by his attitude.

His name was Jack Tar. He was a happy go lucky sort of bloke. He took the good times with the bad.

He didn't cry victimisation, bastardisation, discrimination or for his mum when things didn't go his way.

He took responsibility for his own sometimes, self-destructive actions.

He loved a laugh at anything or anybody. Rank, gender, race, creed or behaviour, it didn't matter to Jack.

He would take the piss out of anyone, including himself. If someone took it out of him he didn't get offended. It was a natural part of life. If he offended someone else, so be it.

Free from many of the rules of a polite society Jack’s manners were somewhat rough.

His ability to swear was legendary

Jack loved women. He loved to chase them to the ends of the earth and sometimes he even caught one (less often than he would have you believe though). His tales of the chase and its conclusion win or lose, is the stuff of legends.






Jack's favourite drink was beer, and he could drink it like a fish. His actions when inebriated would, on occasion, land him in trouble. But, he took it on the chin, did his punishment and then went and did it all again.

Jack loved his job. He took an immense pride in what he did. His radar was always the best in the fleet. His engines always worked better than anyone else's. His eyes could spot a contact before anyone else's and shoot at it first.

It was a matter of personal pride. Jack was the consummate professional when he was at work and sober. He was a bit like a mischievous child. He had a gleam in his eye and a larger than life outlook.

He was as rough as guts. You had to be pig headed and thick skinned to survive. He worked hard and played hard. His masters tut-tutted at some of his more exuberant expressions of joie de vivre, and the occasional bout of number 9's or stoppage let him know where his limits were.



The late 20th Century and on, has seen the demise of Jack. The workplace no longer echoes with ribald comment and bawdy tales. Someone is sure to take offence.

Whereas, those stories of daring do and ingenuity in the face of adversity, usually whilst pissed, lack the audacity of the past. A wicked sense of humor is now a liability, rather than a necessity. Jack has been socially engineered out of existence.

What was once normal is now offensive. Denting someone else's over inflated opinion of their own self worth is now a crime




"AND SO A CULTURE DIES."




40 comments:

  1. Ain't that the god damn truth. The navy is full of kids who never had the cord cut or detached their mouth from their mother's tit. Now we all have to pay the price for these whiny ass holes because they are "special"

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  2. Agreed, the NAVY has allowed itself to BE molded by those coming in..instead of DOING the molding, its sad to see this happen. I served 13 yrs and was shown the door for a "breathing disorder" in order to make room for these kids who feel they are "entitled", they use they NAVY I love and am proud of then they leave at the end of their enlistment/contract ..again EXPECTING to be respected and be GIVEN a job because they served!!

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  3. Excellent = Ill drink to that!
    Fraddy

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  4. So sad but true. During my 30 years of enlisted service I had the privilege to respect and serve with many of this rare breed of men (my father was one). I am told that the tradition of CPO initiations has just been outlawed by the PC officers we have today. I guess the Chiefs just submitted meekly as this came about over time. I remembery my time and would not trade it for anything, but would not care to serve in todays navy. MCPO (Ret)

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  5. This is all true, I served 20 years, and the problem with the new kids coming in is they have never lived the real life as we did, they have their parents looking out for them, they know their rights to a clean life, and they use it against the older men of the RAN. They, the kids of today will never be allowed to grow older and wiser like all the Old Salts did.
    Fj

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  6. I served in the days of wooden ships and iron men and am dissapointed by the 'Nanny' state of political correctness and Health and Safety. We learned from experience, either our own or from those who had served for longer. Today people have no concept of danger unless there are red/white barriers, flashing lights and hazard warning signs. We had to navigate our own safe passage through these hazards, even those placed by out fellow shipmates.
    No doubt most of us remember the dastardly trap set by the seamen as soon as we went east of Suez and we moved into shorts. The Buffer would order the greasing of the fence around the upper deck (Sorry too long on Shore wireless to get that one right)and all their victims sported a horizontal black line across the front of their shots. But we were only caught once.
    Up Spirits

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  7. Served 22 years in the RN.Have to say they were good times. Made a lot of good friends along the way and lost too many as well.The RN made me what I am today and I am proud to say I have served.

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  8. Thanks Shaun and everyone else who has posted Comments

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  9. Yeah but it could be worse we (ex and serving matelots) could be crabs!!!!!

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  10. To true.Only served ten years as a Salty Jack,but they were great years of all described in the "real" days.Had many a good time up in places like Singapore,Bangkok,Hong Kong,Manila,Tokyo & Pearl Harbour,to name a few great "run ashore" Ports.Visited the Captains table on a few occasions & the sick bay for a few"quick jabs".LOL.
    THEY'RE PUSSYS IN THERE NOW & ALL SCARED TO FART.Even the rum's gone.Yep,they've taken the fun right out of it all right.

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  11. Gone are the good old days, where cheating on your spouses in some awesome ports, going to "sick bay for a few quick jabs"(to get rid of whatever you picked up from the whore you got lucky with), the bar fights just for shits and giggles to show off the testosterone level because you didnt make it to last nights "circle-jerk", and when you got home to the wife well, you made up for the time you got to beat the crap out of her and get her and the kids "back in line" before the next "good time", gone are the good ol' days when you didnt have to have any education because your boss would just clout you with a pace stick until you got it right...yep now the people who just actually lived through actual war times instead of an extended Nato party trip are a bunch of "PUSSY's" and are ALL SCARED TO FART", all I can say is I hope you didnt let the door hit your asses on the way out!!!

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    Replies
    1. Hush son.
      Grown ups are talking.

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    2. Yes. 'Grown Ups' are talking...

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    3. Clearly - the young, educated, highly trained, efficient, innovative and competent members in uniform today could not possibly handle 'real' operations as they are severely lacking in the key warfighters skills of alcohol dependency, discourtesy, social and cultural ignorance, and above all, flatulence!

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    4. Can't help but think that you were one of those jerks that couldn't get out of the rack for drills, relieved the watch late due to your delicate digestive system, never cleaned your watchstation, had to be personally mentored on what the difference between a radar and sonar contact, and could always be found on the mess decks.

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  12. The whole thing started changing when I was in, by the time I was released for high tenure, I was glad to be getting out, the panzy azz people that had moved in were just to much to cope with, they would cry about everything and wine so often, us older salts kept crackers and cheese around. Even the old traditions are going to the wayside, for all of us that EARNED our Shellback, SHAME on you newbees for just having it handed to you.

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  13. So true. We were a proud bunch in those days. Thanks for this it certainly brought back memories of old shipmates what a wonderful reminder
    Dusty Miller ex Leading Telegraphist

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  14. Gentlemen
    A good one, you salts out there. I belonged to your ex-colonies submarine service and saw you as comrades and adversaries depending on the day, hour and bar. No matter what the PC slicks say and try the Oceans of our world do not care and will kill the arrogant, the careless and the foolish. A submariner has a different view when he hears the water slide past the overhead and the guys in the engine room dispense the air. The hard ass idiots putting women on my boats had better be ready for weddings at sea and all sorts of problems. We shall smile and work at keeping the people locker dry. As Confused Son said "Even Stupid Things Shall Pass", blow sanitary s and start again.

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  15. Oh so true, putting women on Subs was/is a huge mistake! When I served, a run ashore was just that, we played up fuck but never was a word uttered to Spouses or family upon return, towards the end of my 20 years I could see the change, The Knives in the galley were going missing, only to turn up in your back as some just couldn't keep their mouths shut! The Modern navy would not be for me!

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  16. Nor me my friends I served 27 years and pretty well enjoyed most of it, Not for me anymore I'm afraid.Totally different kettle of fish now.

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  17. The world has evolved, times change and the human race has crawled out of the primordial ooze now....

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  18. I think the modern navy suits modern thinking - to excessive drinking endless smoking and sometimes downright racism that was accepted as culture. The navy should teach more of the skills that are relevant in civvy street - it wouldn't take much to do that as many of the skills currently taught in the navy form a good basis for adaptation in civvy life

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  19. Times change people move on. Im 24 years still serving - totally disagree. Same old routine, last generation having a pop at the next.

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  20. What a load of tosh, the navy is still the same as it was 5, 10, 15 or 25 years ago - the people are still the same, who do all that you have mentioned - the only difference between then and now is SOCIAL MEDIA, people read and post what they want to, the core of the navy still doing that above are not those in the media spotlight. I am still serving after 17 year (sprog i know) and i still witness the same sense of humour, antics, swearing, routine, traditions that i witnessed when my dad was serving that made me want to join, but just like them days that does not make the media - The navy will alwasys breed a certain type of person which will be its backbone, time and technology will not change that

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  21. when I joined as a young kid I didn't know anything about the ROYAL NAVY but I was taught by people who did know and were very intelligent in their own fields - and then when I was competent enough in my field EW I showed the new kids how to work the equipment and they in turn taught others and on and on it goes - 22 years and loved it - so stop fucking moaning about kids running the navy you sad bastards......Bernard Campbell - not ANONYMOUS

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    1. Well said Bernard, served for 28 myself, most rewarding part of the job was passing on skills and traditions to the lads. Ex Chief WAFU not anonymous either Chris Harrell.

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    2. good on you Bernard - I did 28 years Army with a few stamps in my passport and while the army and the soldiers have changed I wouldn't dream of comparing the serving members of today to myself for the very reason it is different. My opinion, the Services today are using far more sophisticated equipment and are far more seasoned with operational service. Some of the toss bags on this post seem to forget we have been at war for over 10 years now and the blokes those above are criticising would be wearing the medals to prove it. My son recently joined the RAN and I am personally pleased that some of the wankers above with nothing bice to say are all out now - shane fletcher.

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    3. I agree Bernard, this is a load of old Bollocks. I am 70 now and joined in 1959 and did my time. The kids who join nowadays are no different from what we were as regards to innocence. I had never drank a pint or been with a prostitute, (never have). Give them time to grow up, and they will be as stupid as all the three badge men of our time. Including the above people. These kids volunteered to serve the country. Well done to them. Thanks for listening.

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  22. Times have changed.

    For better AND for worse.
    A lot of the younger lads in are whiney and have a sense of entitlement.

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  23. Everything changes over time, it's a part of life. Whether it's for the better or the worse either way the RN will still get whatever job needs doing, done.

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  24. Some has been good change, some has been bad change.

    We work harder now... there's no skimping on workloads in the 'minimum-manned world', but we are not allowed to balance that with 'play hard' anymore. Port visits are controlled down to curfews, ethics and morals warnings, and paperwork... yes the paperwork. dry port visits are becoming the norm. You get into trouble now for being 'imperfect' instead of being a bad sailor.

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  25. What a load of wining crusty old sailors on here. Sure the RAN has changed, become more modern & politically correct - guess what, IT HAD TOO! I for one am glad I didn't serve with any of you negative salts.

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  26. Yeah! Get up the crusty old salts for posting this garbage, you young hipsters. I for one was proud on how well you guys surrendered so heroically
    in the gulf to a few Iranians in dingys with pitchforks. And the interviews afterwards would make Falkland Veteran shed a tear over your struggle.
    I'm sure the current RN and RAN 'salts' will bravely face enemy fire once the sickbay clears them of anxiety, bad backs, headaches etc etc.

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  27. As an old and salty sea dog who's stoker career spanned many years, I for one would like to be remembered as a Jack Tar because that was the way the navy was! Work hard and play hard was our creed, live for today and sod being being politically correct,we got the job done and that was what mattered.

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  28. What a bunch of old dinasaurs that cant accept change, willing to work for peanuts all for the ability to be brainwashed into the work hard play hard get drunk mentality. You do realize that they gave you tots to keep your mind mush, that is something to be proud off. look I can go bang rocks with head. God forgive us the day the new sailors don't accept change like you monkeys. Do you all live in the back woods in a shack because you never thought of your financial future as well. Grow up, the navy matured, seems the only ones that didn't is you clowns. I did 30 years and saw a lot of change, didn't like some of it, but then again that is human nature, if you think the "good ole days" was better than today, you were truly brainwashed by the grog, just how they liked you, stupid and obedient

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  29. Spot on I reckon. WAY TOO PC these days, if you ask me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  30. The description was my Old Man, RN 1938 to 1962, the best dad anyone could whish for, I only had him for 15 years of my life, and a few years of that he was at sea, firm but fair, had a few clips from him, but only when I deserved it, like swearing at my mother. His grandson(my nephew) joined up last year, what a difference, from what I was brought up with.

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  31. The original article was written by Mike "Ginge" Cundell who recently crossed the bar. It can be found here: http://rnsubs.co.uk/dits-bits/articles/crew/jack-tar.html

    Mike was a long serving member of the Barrow Branch of the Submariners Association who crossed the bar in December 2015. A former CMEM(M) who served on Porpoise, Courageous, Conqueror and Sceptre between 1967 and 1983

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  32. I served when men were made of steel,yes you took the good with the bad and made the most of it. The kids of today and yes they are kids. I would not like to be in the Navy with the attitude that is taught in todays Navy. The one thing that is missing from the sailors of today is respect.
    LS QMG>

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  33. If you look as though you've had a few returning onboard, the QM/OOD will breath-a-lyse you, if you're over 0.02 you get locked up, after three chances you're discharged, according to currently serving members.

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